The Yamaha R1 Motorcycle

First, let’s quickly cover the basic specifications of 2009 Yamaha R1 bikes before getting side tracked by specifying all the new technology it features. 2009 Yamaha R1 motorcycles feature a liquid-cooled, 998 cc, inline four-cylinder, sixteen-valve DOHC engine. They’ve got a six-speed manual transmission with a multi-plate slipper clutch. The Yamaha R1 engine is capable of 180 horsepower at 12,500 rpm and 85 pound-feet (11.8 kilogram-meter) of torque at 10,000 rpm. The Yamaha R1 top speed has been experienced by consumer at or around 190 mph (257.5 kph). All this power is currently available for less than $12,500.

Now, onto the new Yamaha R1 motorcycle technology for 2009! The 2009 Yamaha R1 motorcycles are the first to feature crossplane crankshaft technology in a two-wheel motorized vehicle. Crossplane crankshaft technology is a extremely technical, very complicated machine, and a full explanation of it could easily fill its own article. Therefore, we’ll try to describe it in the shortest, simplest term we can.

In a classic engine, gasoline combustion commutes pistons in up-and-down action. The pistons, in turn, drive the crankshaft. The crankshaft turns the reciprocal motion of the pistons into rotational motion that ultimately turns the back wheel of the bike. This translation from reciprocal to rotational motion is never perfect. Energy is generally lost when motion changes form, not to point out a timing delay from the pistons igniting to the wheels turning. The greater the motion and energy (in this case, the RPMs), the greater the loss in energy and motion transfer. What this means to you as a motorcycle driver is that the fast you go, the less control your throttle has over the rear wheel.

A crossplane crankshaft layout takes a fully different approach. First, as a substitute of two sets of pistons firing alternately, this engine involves four sets of pistons shooting in rotation. Second, the connection rods from pistons to crankshaft are placed at ninety degrees from one another around the crankshaft. The firing order of the pistons is 270°-180°-90°-180°. The outcome of the right-angle area and non-liner firing series is that the exchange of energy and motion from the pistons to the rear wheel is much more clean and exact. What this means for you as a motorbike rider is that your accelerator pedal has much more control of the rear wheel, allowing a steady, linear acceleration and smoother handling of the motorcycle, even at increased speeds.

Another innovation in 2009 Yamaha R1 motorcycles is a forced-air intake system. This system increases air intake efficiency by using the natural airflow generated when driving to pressurize the air in the air cleaner box. As more air in the motor generates more power, the new R1 engine has extraordinary power, especially at high speeds.

Yamaha has also adjusted the chip-controlled throttle and intake technology from racetrack motorbikes. This merges computer technology with the driver’s throttle control for electronic micro-control of the fuel injection and air intake systems. The outcome is a throttle reaction that is both instantaneous and exact. Together, all these engineering enhancement in 2009 Yamaha R1 bikes provide more power and speed, and better pilot control at the same time. What’s not to adore?

Since one can’t totally redesign the engine without redesigning the frame, Yamaha has done that as well, consisting of many new improvements. It includes an aluminum frame precisely well balanced for the mixture of both stiffness and flex that a racing motor cycle wants. It also features crafted aluminum pistons, a light and portable titanium intake valve, and electronically actuated steering dampeners.

Regardless of of 2009 Yamaha R1 motorcycles’ strengths and innovations, including great acceleration, outstanding responsiveness, and heightened maneuverability, it has its drawbacks like any vehicle. Some users report finding it to be unpleasant when travelling or driving long distances. The bike gives off a lot of heat, which can get uncomfortable at low speeds, or in the stop-and-start nature of rush hour city traffic.

On the other hand, some people may debate, 2009 Yamaha R1 motorcycles are not built for commuting – they’re built for racing.